Homesteading and Minimalism

Can homesteading and minimalism go together? Both concepts speak to identity. Ultimately, you decide, what does the label mean?

Then, whether the labels apply to you.

Being a homesteader can mean doing more things yourself, being more self-sufficient, and resisting the culture of materialism.

Being a minimalist usually includes defining a personal focus on what really matters, and engaging in an ongoing process of weeding out things that do not add value or meaning.

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If your ideal homestead includes land, trees, and livestock, then you must own the objects needed to provide care and maintenance. The care itself might be part of an intentional lifestyle.

If being a minimalist includes only owning an arbitrary number of items, you might fall into the trap of being forced to buy items when you need them, and regularly discarding items just to avoid ownership.

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Intentional Living

I have been thinking a lot about the themes of a life well-lived. There are certain things that I call “part of my definition of the good life.”

A good example of this is books. Notoriously, books are heavy and not very practical if you move around a lot. I have used a Kindle device, Audible subscription, and Kindle app on my phone at various times. But, I love books.

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So, I have found a balance. I buy books secondhand, and I keep a limited number of books that I really like. I come back to them again and again.

But we do not keep accumulating them. Instead, we frequent the library, we use electronic sources, and we limit the size of the home library.

The good life looks different for everybody.

I find that with music, good food, good stories, and companionship, life is rich. Having material things on a bigger or grander scale does not enhance or replace the essentials.

L’essentiel est invisible pour les yeux.

(What is essential is invisible to the eyes.)

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry in The Little Prince

Commonalities of the Homesteader and Minimalist

Can you be both? I think so.

And what I like about it, is that both ideals can be scaled to your current life.

We don’t have to wait for the perfect life circumstances to come.

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You can practice minimalism in your attire or your bedroom.

You can practice homesteading in an apartment or on an acreage.

Commonalities include focus, resourcefulness, and efficiency.

Being mindful. Using resources, including your own time and energy, wisely.

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For more thoughts on homesteading and minimalism

  1. Medium – The 12 Design Principles of Permaculture as Rules of Living
  2. Morning Chores – 20 Tips to Help You Become a Minimalist Homesteader
  3. A Home Made From Scratch – Minimalism vs. Homesteading
  4. Homestead Hustle – Minimalism on the Homestead
  5. 15 Acre Homestead – Minimalism in the Home
  6. Couch to Homestead – 9 Essential Tips to Becoming a Minimalist Homesteader
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